Posts Tagged 'Trees'

Time to speak out

I’ve bitten my tongue for far too long. I’ve let climate-change deniers have their say to avoid stepping on various toes and I can’t do it any longer.

Climate change is real. Period.

There, I said it.

It took a vacation to “my” Colorado mountains for a family reunion to open my eyes to how bad things really are.

If you don’t believe me or the consensus of real scientists who deal in facts, I have a challenge for you: Take a trip to the Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado and go up to about 9,000 feet. Take in the wonder that is around you for a while and then start looking at things in detail. You will start to notice dead and dying lodge-pole pines; in some places whole mountainsides wiped out.

You will see burn piles where last winter, after snow fell, rangers burned 5,000 piles of beetle-infested and dead trees, according to rangers I spoke with. The burn marks were evident at that altitude and they’ve already started building piles to burn this winter (when snow’s on the ground so as to not spread fire).

Who did I get this from?

  • Two different park rangers at two different locations, one as worried as I, the other slightly more optimistic.
  • A wildlife biologist who lives there (extended family member to fully disclose).
  • I also observed the destruction myself.

One of the rangers told me he started a talk at one of the campgrounds two years ago detailing how climate change is affecting the park.

Today, groups are studying a little mammal, a cousin to the rabbit, called the pika. It’s the park’s canary-in-the-coal-mine, if you will, a term I used with the ranger. Groups are studying its changing migration patterns and watching the little guys for signs of extinction. It will go first, the ranger said.

There wasn’t enough cold last year to kill the beetles that are eating the trees from the inside out. Some always survive and kill a few trees. But the trees need at least a week of below 20 degree weather in winter to kill off the bulk of the beetles. That didn’t happen.

Can I say that again? There weren’t 7 consecutive days of high temperatures below 20 degrees Fahrenheit in that part of the Colorado mountains last winter. That’s stunning. I remember that kind of cold in Denver, much less the mountains.

Then there are the fires raging all across the parched west, including the one west of Fort Collins, about 50 miles or so as the crow flies from the northern edge of the park. All those dead trees are tinder for a spark; fuel for fires started by nature or humans and quickly spread by winds that won’t quit.

Or check out Africa, where parched is taking on a whole new meaning. Or the arctic, where polar bears can’t find enough ice to survive.

How much observable data do you need?

Study what’s really happening, then come back and tell me climate change isn’t real with a straight face.

And just for fun, watch this clip of physicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson on Real Time with Bill Maher cleaning the clock of climate denier and former GM chairman Bob Lutz using changing migration patterns as his example.

Closer to home, Kentucky didn’t have much of a winter last year. School actually got out on time, which didn’t happened in three prior years that I’ve paid attention because of a school-age child. And many of the “snow days” in those years weren’t because of snow, they were because of ice. We get ice because it doesn’t get and stay cold enough to snow.

We might have an extreme winter this year, Colorado might have little winter again, or the reverse might be true or some combination of severe storms, or drought, too much cold or not enough. Remember the deadly and destructive March 2 tornadoes? Awful early in the year, don’t you think?

That’s what climate change is: Long-term it means the planet is warming, but short-term, it means changing weather patterns, and more extreme and severe weather (droughts, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, etc.).

There’s no more “normal.”

We better get used to it since politically no one seems willing to stand up to the deniers.

Get free trees and grocery bags on Earth Day

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, merchants at Lexington Green will give away either a dogwood or redbud tree seedling with a purchase Thursday, while supplies last. The trees average 12” to 18” tall and come bare-root from the Kentucky Division of Forestry.

Meanwhile, in Versailles, the Woodford County Conservation District will be at Kroger from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., giving away reusable canvas grocery bags. And elementary students have decorated more than 2,000 paper grocery bags that customers can use that day.

There will be other free stuff during the day at the store, including compact fluorescent light bulbs and water gauges.

Getting advice on your ash tree

This from the city on dealing with the emerald ash borer, which is, even at you read this, spreading through Kentucky:

The Lexington Tree Board has issued a citizen advisory that makes general recommendation about treating ash trees for the emerald ash borer. The insect has devastated ash tree populations in northern states and has been found in central Kentucky and Lexington. Many ash trees located on public and private property already have been found to be infested.

“There are more than one-half-million ash trees in Fayette County,” said Karen Angelucci, Tree Board Chair. “Every ash tree is at risk of being severely affected or killed by the insect unless they’re successfully treated.”

The tree board handout that provides information about treating ash trees is available through the city’s web site at:

www.lexingtonky.gov/eab.

The handout offers some simple instructions on determining if a homeowner can treat a tree themselves or should seek professional help from a certified arborist or tree specialist.

For trees that can be treated by a homeowner, mid-to-late Spring is the best time to treat ash trees with an insecticide available at most larger garden supply or nurseries. Larger trees that require professional insecticide injections should also be treated in the Spring.